How do you use rather correctly?

How do you use rather correctly?

We use rather as a degree adverb (rather cold, rather nice). We also use it to express alternatives and preferences (green rather than blue, coffee rather than tea, slowly rather than quickly).

What does complicated situation mean?

adj made up of intricate parts or aspects that are difficult to understand or analyse.

What’s the meaning of rather than?

(Entry 1 of 2) 1 —used with the infinitive form of a verb to indicate negation as a contrary choice or wish rather than continue the argument, he walked awaychose to sing rather than play violin.

How do you use rather as a conjunction?

in the conjunction phrase rather than: It would be better to make a decision now, rather than leave it until later. as a way of showing how a sentence is connected to what has already been said: His purpose was not so much to attack his rivals. Rather, it was to defend his own position. He was rather a handsome boy.

Is quite an adverb?

Quite is a degree adverb. When we use quite with a gradable adjective or adverb, it usually means ‘a little, moderately but not very’.

What does but rather mean?

The phrase “but rather” is used in a similar way to “however.” This phrase serves to show contrast between two ideas, and essentially means “on the other hand” or “in fact.”

What is the adverb for quiet?

quietly adverb
quietly adverb Speak quietly. : in a quiet manner : quietly The engine runs quiet.

What kind of word is quite?

degree adverb
Quite is a degree adverb. It has two meanings depending on the word that follows it: ‘a little, moderately but not very’ and ‘very, totally or completely’: … When we use quite with a gradable adjective or adverb, it usually means ‘a little, moderately but not very’.

Would prefer or would rather?

Note that would rather is followed by a bare infinitive without to, whereas prefer requires to + infinitive. Would rather (but not would prefer to) is also followed by a past tense when we want to involve other people in the action, even though it has a present or future meaning.

Had better or would rather?

Contracted would – I’d, he’d, she’d, we’d, you’d, they’d. -She’d rather stay with me than go out with you. Had better. We use had better when we give advice to others.

Share via: